Social Campaign Research l Home Entertainment Queries l Global Ad Expenditure

September 9, 2011

nielsen-diaper-sep-2011.JPGThe explosion of social media intelligence offers a vast opportunity to listen and engage with customers to shape products and services that tap into unmet demand, according to data from The Nielsen Company. One success story demonstrates how social media was used to reshape a baby diaper campaign with enhanced results by combining both listening and asking research.

The traditional survey results showed that the majority of consumers believed that “environmentally friendly” was the most important product attribute. But in authentic, online conversations, consumers indicated that “organic” and “avoiding diaper rash” were the most important product features. The social media analysis revealed a more accurate picture of consumer sentiment around product desires. This lead to a new campaign theme centered on “Caring,” which produced phenomenal results for the brand.

  • The strongest home entertainment query growth is currently in more navigational terms like “Netflix” and to a lesser degree, “Redbox,” according to Google. Query volume for Netflix hit a new peak in February 2011 after 90%+ growth in both 2009 and 2010.
  • Global ad expenditures are forecast to reach $471 billion USD this year, the same as the peak level of expenditure reached in 2008, according to estimates from Zenith Optimedia. Expenditure is predicted to grow 4.1% in 2011.
  • Using the keyword destination tool on Compete.com to get a list of sites referred to by a broad match for the generic keyword “pizza,” analysts found that Pizzahut.com and Dominos.com were the hands-down winners. Approximately 16% of all “pizza” related search referrals went to Pizzahut.com and 5.8% went to Dominos.com.
  • “Minorities” are already the majority in some of the biggest cities in the US, and demographers predict that the same will be true of the country as a whole before 2045, according to Millward Brown. Advertisers are advised to move away from “ethic silo” thinking.

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