Online Consumers Very Uncomfortable With Companies Sharing Their Data

April 4, 2014

This article is included in these additional categories:

Customer-Centric | Digital | Financial Services | Privacy & Security | Retail & E-Commerce | Social Media | Telecom

RadiusGMR-Consumer-Comfort-Data-Access-Sharing-Apr2014Online consumers are generally uncomfortable with the ability for organizations across a number of sectors to access their personal information – and that discomfort reaches new levels when they’re asked about companies sharing that data. In fact, close to half – or more – respondents to a new Radius Global Market Research study indicate that they’re very or extremely uncomfortable with companies sharing their personal information, with only about 1 in 5 signaling a strong level of comfort.

Interestingly, while respondents for the most part believe that it’s a company’s responsibility to secure their data, that feeling isn’t uniformly held across industries. The following provides a quick summary of consumer attitudes to privacy responsibility across the 6 sectors measures, along with their views of the best and worst-performing brands in those spaces.

Financial Websites

  • 45% feel that it is entirely the company’s responsibility to protect their data, versus 14% who believe it is entirely their responsibility.
  • Of the financial websites tracked, PayPal is viewed as doing best at securing personal data.
  • 27% feel that none of the websites do the best job.

E-Shopping Websites

  • 40% feel that it is entirely the company’s responsibility to protect their data, versus 14% who believe it is entirely their responsibility.
  • Of the e-shopping websites tracked, Amazon is viewed as doing best at securing personal data.
  • 43% feel that none of the websites do the best job.

Wireless Companies

  • 34% feel that it is entirely the company’s responsibility to protect their data, versus 14% who believe it is entirely their responsibility.
  • Of the wireless companies tracked, Verizon is viewed as doing best at securing personal data.
  • A majority 51% feel that none of the companies do the best job.

Cell Phone/Smartphone Manufacturers

  • 31% feel that it is entirely the company’s responsibility to protect their data, versus 17% who believe it is entirely their responsibility.
  • Of the brands tracked, Apple is viewed as doing best at securing personal data.
  • 52% feel that none of the brands do the best job.

Operating Systems

  • 31% feel that it is entirely the company’s responsibility to protect their data, versus 18% who believe it is entirely their responsibility.
  • Of those tracked, Apple is viewed as doing best at securing personal data.
  • 49% feel that none of the websites do the best job.

Social Media Websites

  • In an interesting twist, just 23% feel that it is entirely the company’s responsibility to protect their data, versus a larger 29% who believe it is entirely their responsibility.
  • Of those tracked, Facebook is viewed as doing best at securing personal data.
  • Notably, 70% feel that none of the websites do the best job.

Other Findings:

  • Some 86% of respondents agree somewhat or completely that they are concerned about identity theft. About 8 in 10 only purchase from companies they trust, and only 45% will give up their location for online mapping.
  • Two-thirds agree that they only visit store/purchase products/services from companies that can handle their data.
  • About half have chosen not to purchase a brand/product from a retail store because of privacy concerns.

About the Data: The results are based on a survey of 1,008 US consumers who own or use regularly a computer, tablet or mobile phone. Respondents were recruited from a nationally representative sample, and online interviews were carried out in December 2013.

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